Serlachius museot

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+358 (0)3 488 6800 | Gustaf, R. Erik. Serlachiuksen katu 2 | Gösta, Joenniementie 47 | Mänttä

Open summertime 1 June–31 August daily 10am–6pm, wintertime 1 September–31 May Tue–Sun 11am–6pm.

Sulje

+358 (0)3 488 6800 | Gustaf, R. Erik. Serlachiuksen katu 2 | Gösta, Joenniementie 47 | Mänttä

Open
wintertime 1 September–31 May Tue–Sun 11am–6pm
summertime 1 June–31 August daily 10am–6pm

Feel free to
come farther

Wednesday 15. January 2020

Important acquisition for Finland – Anselm Kiefer’s artwork Väinämöinen Ilmarinen to Serlachius Museums

Gösta Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation has acquired for its collection Anselm Kiefer’s work Väinämöinen Ilmarinen. It is the first of Kiefer's Kalevala-theme works be sold to a museum collection.

Anselm Kiefer, one of the most prominent names in contemporary art, explores in his works the great issues of humankind, drawing on history, literature and philosophy. The Kalevala, the Finnish national epic poem, has also long made an impression on Kiefer: “I read the Kalevala in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Recently, I again turned my attention to the Kalevala’s verses and also painted works inspired by the epic.

Kiefer explains that he is interested in backgrounds: ”The Kalevala, the Song of the Nibelungs, Ancient Egyptian fables and other mythologies seek to understand and describe the world as a whole. Such a comprehensive description of the world is difficult today, because science and various professions have packed the world into silos. The world is fragmented, and we do not see it as a whole. One of the new areas of natural science, string theory, does however seek to provide an overall picture of the world, in which the microcosm and macrocosm meet, just as in ancient mythologies, like the Kalevala”.

When Kiefer’s Kalevala-theme works will be completed is not yet known. Currently, one work on the theme is on display at the White Cube Gallery in London. 

Pauli Sivonen, Director of Serlachius Museums, is delighted with the acquisition: “The permanent presence of the work in Mänttä is a natural continuation of the collaboration between Anselm Kiefer and Serlachius that began with the major exhibition in 2015.”

The work Väinämöinen Ilmarinen came to Serlachius via the United States. Kiefer donated the work to a fund-raising campaign for an extension to the Albright-Knox Art Museum, directed by Janne Gallen-Kallela-Sirén (www.albrightknox.org). Sirén proposed that the work not be auctioned but offered to Finnish public collections, initially to Serlachius, the museum that had organised a major Kiefer exhibition a few years earlier. This way the work could end up in Finland, the home of the Kalevala and Finnish Kalevala art. 

Sirén has been studying Kiefer’s art for nearly thirty years. When Kiefer established an art foundation a couple of years ago to foster his life’s work and research on it, he invited Sirén to be its Chairman of the Board. Sirén has served in the position, alongside his work a museum director, since 2018.

“Mythology, poetry, philosophy, world history and wars – these themes are the ocean that washes through Kiefer's art. He does not paint individual series of works, although in a certain way each theme addressed by the artist can be perceived as a kind of ensemble, at least in connection with museum exhibitions. In Kiefer's art, different sources and themes are interlinked and are part of a great continuum. One day, Kiefer’s Kalevala works could be brought together into a magnificent exhibition and, of course, it would be interesting to see it in Finland, too, where the Kalevala is the national epic, but also a partially forgotten spiritual and cultural resource,” explains Sirén.   

Anselm Kiefer’s works are often monumental in their themes and dimensions. Väinämöinen Ilmarinen is also a large-scale work. It features, characteristically for Kiefer, a desolate landscape resembling a battlefield, with a submarine and aircraft in the foreground: the seer Väinämöinen is depicted as a submarine, the creator of the heavens, and blacksmith Ilmarinen as an aircraft. 

The work will be on display at Serlachius Museum Gösta in the end of March.

For further information, please contact:
Pauli Sivonen, Director of Serlachius Museums, tel. +358 50 566 1355, pauli.sivonen@serlachius.fi
Susanna Yläjärvi, Information Officer, tel. +358 50 560 0156, susanna.ylajarvi@serlachius.fi

Anselm Kiefer, Väinämöinen Ilmarinen, 2018, emulsion, oil, acrylic, shellac, rope and lead on canvas, 280 x 380 cm, Gösta Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation, copyright: © Anselm Kiefer.


Tuesday 8. October 2019

The Quest for Happiness of Italian artists on display in Serlachius Museums

The Quest for Happiness – Italian Art Now
Serlachius Museums 26 October 2019 – 29 March 2020

The Quest for Happiness – Italian Art Now presents a selection of the most interesting Italian contemporary artists following the scarlet thread of the pursuit of happiness. The majority of them have never exhibited in Finland before.
 
For many of them, creativity and energy have been the answer to the economic and political crisis that struck Italy in 2008 – as well as the whole Western world. After a decade of geopolitical overturn, happiness became a value of rising importance and a remarkably popular subject in many fields: personal achievement, job contexts, academic researches, consumerism and environment protection, to name a few.

The exhibition’s artists present through their artworks a kaleidoscopic interpretation of the concept of happiness today, touching on key topics such as spirituality and materialism, family and communities, time and nature, history and identity, politics and freedom, feelings and technologies. The show offers a chance to investigate what happiness means in contemporary art from the viewpoint of young and mid-career Italian artists who have already experienced one of the most severe political, economic and social crisis in generations.
 
Yuri Ancarani, Silvia Camporesi, Loris Cecchini, Federica Di Carlo, Goldschmied & Chiari, Francesco Jodice, Marzia Migliora, Matteo Montani, Okkult Motion Pictures (Alessandro Scali & Marco Calabrese), Federico Pietrella, Pietro Ruffo, Marinella Senatore, Federico Solmi and ZimmerFrei: 14 artists from Northern to Southern Italy, working with a variety of media (painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, performance, installation, video, new media) to form a wide and fresh spectrum of the contemporary art production in Italy in the recent years, away from the Italian clichés abroad.
 
The exhibition is curated by Maria Stella Bottai, Lorella Scacco and Pirjo Immonen.

Artists Loris Cecchini, Marzia Migliora, Matteo Montani and Goldschmied & Chiari are present at the exhibition opening and the press meeting in the Serlachius Museums on 25 October 2019.

To accompany the exhibition, a catalogue in three languages has been published by Parvs Publishing Ltd.

Additional programme of the exhibition:

25 October 2019 Press meeting at Serlachius Museum Gösta 12.30 pm.

25 October 2019 Exhibition vernissage at Serlachius Museum Gösta on 6 pm.

26 October 2019 The curators present the exhibition in Finnish and in English languages at 1 pm and 3 pm.
8 March 2020 Marinella Senatore’s performance which is completed in workshops that her The School of Narrative Dance organises at Serlachius Museums.

8 March 2020 Outi Pinomaa’s lecture: The use of Italian words in the terminology of art, music and gastronomy in Finnish language.

7–8 March 2020 Italian Food Weekend at Serlachius Museums’ Restaurant Gösta.

Further information, image requests, notices of an intention to attend the press conference and exhibition opening:
Susanna Yläjärvi, Information Officer of Serlachius Museums, susanna.ylajarvi@serlachius.fi,
+358 (0)50 560 0156.

Press releases and press images also available at Serlachius Museums’ website: www.serlachius.fi/en/for-media/

Follow Serlachius Museums:
facebook.com/serlachius    twitter.com/serlachius   instagram.com/serlachiusmuseums

The Serlachius Museums are open:
in the winter season 1 September–31 May, from Tuesday to Sunday 11 am-6 pm.

Visiting addresses:
Serlachius Museum Gösta, Joenniementie 47, 35800 Mänttä, Finland
Serlachius Museum Gustaf, R. Erik Serlachiuksen katu 2, 35800 Mänttä, Finland

 

Cento anni d’Italia in Finlandia | A Hundred Years of Italy in Finland


Saturday 21. September 2019

Gerard Byrne’s video work In Our Time is exhibited at Serlachius Museums, Finland

Irish artist Gerard Byrne (b. 1969) is known for ambitious video installations and photographic projects. Works utilising documentary material, theatre and literature often challenge our understandings of the immediate past. His video installation In Our Time creates a portrait in time of the everyday routines of an American radio station and raises questions about the relationships between radio broadcasts, pop music and collective memory.

In Our Time was commissioned for Skulptur Projekte Münster 2017 in Germany. Since then, the work has been exhibited in New York, Dublin, Vienna and Stockholm. Serlachius Museums’ exhibition is the Byrne’s first in Finland. The exhibition is curated by Serlachius Museums’ Head Curator, Laura Kuurne.

Centred around the control booth of the radio station, the camera moves continuously through the meticulously realised mise en scène Byrne has created, picturing in detail the cassettes and vinyl, the microphones and speakers, alongside the various other hardware used to coalesce pop music, call-ins, news bulletins and the voice of the presenter himself, into a seamless ethereal broadcast. Of non-fixed duration, In Our Time plays back in sync with actual time of day during the museum opening hours, and as such establishes a richly complex relationship between the hidden space of the radio broadcast depicted, and the physical circumstances of the museum viewer. As with many of Byrne’s previous works, In Our Time conjoins ideas of naturalism from film, physical presence from theatre, together with the concrete temporality of radio broadcasting, into a hybrid form influenced by Bertolt Brecht.

In Our Time is a study of radio as a model of time, from the micro level of adverts or radio jingles, to the macro level of timeless pop classics. The artist utilises and emphasises radio's inherent tapestry-like structure where different references and songs are interwoven, and key motifs are repeated at various intervals throughout the day. Radio’s inherently rhythmic nature — from daily music or talk programmes to updates on weather or traffic repeated at symmetric intervals throughout the hour — creates a modular structure of indefinite duration, similar to the serial qualities of Minimalism. With a focus on this structure and the materiality of the radio studio and its contents, Byrne continues an ongoing interest in the legacies of minimalism, and the complex nature of how art engages its own place in time.

Further information: Laura Kuurne, Head Curator, Serlachius Museums, tel. +358 (0) 44 269 6677, laura.kuurne@serlachius.fi
Image requests: Susanna Yläjärvi, Information Officer, Serlachius Museums, tel. +358 50 560 0156 susanna.ylajarvi@serlachius.fi

Press releases and images can also be found at the address: www.serlachius.fi/en/for-media/

Follow the Serlachius Museums:
facebook.com/serlachius   twitter.com/serlachius   instagram.com/serlachiusmuseums

The Serlachius Museums are open in the winter season, 1 September–31 May, from Tuesday to Sunday, 11 am–6 pm.

Visiting addresses:
Serlachius Museum Gösta, Joenniementie 47, 35800 Mänttä, Finland
Serlachius Museum Gustaf, R. Erik Serlachiuksen katu 2, 35800 Mänttä, Finland
 


Friday 17. May 2019

Serlachius Museums presents American artist Matthew Day Jackson’s first solo exhibition and role-playing game in Finland

Maa, a new exhibition by Matthew Day Jackson at the Serlachius Museum Gösta in Mänttä, imagines a post-apocalyptic world thousand years in the future, made uninhabitable by humankind. What has become of life on Earth’s surface without human influence, and how has the world recovered from the destruction? And what of the human survivors who have become subterranean refugees, and the scouts that are sent to explore the devastated surface and assess its healing process? What does it feel like the first time you see the Moon and stars that are only known through myth and storytelling?

Maa is comprised of two complementary parts that interweave archaeology, evolution theory, occult ritual, Gothic cathedrals, colour theories, horror and sci-fi literature, and the history of the conquest of space. The first component is an installation of figurative sculpture made at human scale, created over the past ten years. These works exemplify Jackson’s return to the human form as a wry testament to anthropocentric self-regard. The sculptures are mapped within the exhibition space on the Golden Section, the calculation studied in Ancient Greece to the present day, and a recurring schema in Jackson’s work.

The sculptures are unique works but, grouped together, the figures speak to each other and the other component of the exhibition, the role-playing game Maa. The post-apocalyptic landscape of the game and engagement with its world is another possible access point for engagement with the sculptures. Maa may be played within the exhibition space in the company of the figurative sculpture, or in the location of one’s choosing, in a group or as a solo experience. The Maa game box replaces the traditional exhibition catalogue.

Matthew Day Jackson is an artist of the information age. He is insatiably curious and interested in the interconnectivity of ideas, places, people and objects, and making skilful use of the hits that search-engine algorithms offer him. His works, whose conceptual offshoots are multi-directional, are reminiscent of complex maths equations or the forking paths in Jorge Luis Borges’ imaginary gardens. They are intellectual stages on which history and age-old myths view their own mirror-images in the distant future.

The exhibition Maa is curated by Timo Valjakka with exhibition design by Tarja Väätänen. The role-playing game Maa is designed by Matthew Day Jackson together with Tom Morton (Contributing Editor, Frieze magazine) and Juhana Pettersson (Vampire the Masquerade, 5th Edition). The exhibition has been co-produced with Hauser & Wirth Gallery.

Museums in the middle of the forest

The Serlachius Museums Gösta and Gustaf form an exceptional museum complex in Finland. The museums are situated in small town in the middle of the forest. In 2014, Art Museum Gösta received alongside it a timber-frame extension, the Pavilion, designed by the Barcelona architecture studio MX_SI.

With addition of the Pavilion, Serlachius Museums have also become a major player in the field of contemporary Finnish art. Each year, the museums present a number of fascinating Finnish and international contemporary art exhibitions. The Serlachius Museums are renowned for their high-quality art collection, which is constantly being supplemented with thoughtful acquisitions.

The Serlachius Museums are open:

in the winter season 1 September–31 May, from Tuesday to Sunday 11 am-6 pm

in the summer season 1 June–31 August, every day 10 am–6 pm

Visiting addresses:
Serlachius Museum Gösta, Joenniementie 47, 35800 Mänttä, Finland

Serlachius Museum Gustaf, R. Erik Serlachiuksen katu 2, 35800 Mänttä, Finland

www.serlachius.fi
@serlachius #maatheroleplayinggame #maatheexhibition

Further information:
Timo Valjakka, Curator, timo.valjakka@kolumbus.fi
Juhana Pettersson, Game Designer, juhana.pettersson@gmail.com

Image requests:
Susanna Yläjärvi, Information Officer of Serlachius Museums, susanna.ylajarvi@serlachius.fi, +358 (0)50 560 0156.


Thursday 18. April 2019

Masterpieces from Serlachius Museums’ own collection now on show

Serlachius Museums’ new collection hanging Classic Works of Fine Art at the Manor presents works of the Gösta Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation, one of the Nordic countries’ most significant private collections. The permanent hanging opened on 6 April 2019.

One of the collection’s most important artists is Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865–1931), whose works occupy a central role in the Golden Age of Finnish art of the late 19th century/early 20th century.

Gösta Serlachius (1876–1942), owner of the major Finnish paper company G. A. Serlachius Ltd., amassed a significant art collection and, to preserve it, established in 1933 the Fine Arts Foundation that bears his name. Serlachius was particularly interested in the output of Gallen-Kallela, who is known as the national artist of Finland.

Classic Works of Fine Art at the Manor also presents a substantial set of Helene Schjerfbeck (1862–1946) works, including a series of portraits of men painted in the 1920s. Over the decades, the Fine Arts Foundation has acquired a significant collection of Schjerfbeck’s art.

In the Fine Arts Foundation’s collection, representatives of the Golden Age of Finnish art and early Modernism of the beginning of the 20th century include Albert Edelfelt, Hugo Simberg, Ellen Thesleff, Magnus Enckell, Pekka Halonen, Eero Järnefelt and many others. All in all, the hanging features around 150 works from 100 artists.

An important segment of the hanging consists of a collection of Spanish, Flemish and Dutch art from the 16th and 17th centuries, including works of Francisco de Zurbarán (1598–1664), Juan de Zurbarán (1620–1649) and Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652).

Museums in the middle of the forest

The Serlachius Museums Gösta and Gustaf form an exceptional museum complex in Finland. The museums are situated in small town in the middle of the forest. In 2014, Art Museum Gösta received alongside it a timber-frame extension, the Pavilion, designed by the Barcelona architecture studio MX_SI.

With addition of the Pavilion, Serlachius Museums have also become a major player in the field of contemporary Finnish art. Each year, the museums present a number of fascinating Finnish and international contemporary art exhibitions. The Serlachius Museums are renowned for their high-quality art collection, which is constantly being supplemented with thoughtful acquisitions.

The Serlachius Museums are open:
in the winter season, 1 September–31 May, from Tuesday to Sunday 11 am–6 pm
in the summer season, 1 June – 31 August, every day 10 am–6 pm.

Visiting addresses:
Serlachius Museum Gösta, Joenniementie 47, 35800 Mänttä, Finland
Serlachius Museum Gustaf, R. Erik Serlachiuksen katu 2, 35800 Mänttä, Finland

Additional information and image requests:
Susanna Yläjärvi, Information Officer, Serlachius Museums, tel. +358 (0) 50 560 0156 susanna.ylajarvi@serlachius.fi

Artists of collection hanging

Wäinö Aaltonen (1894–1966)
Fredrik Ahlstedt (1839–1901)
Aarne Aho (1904–1978)
Tor Arne (* 1934)
Hannes Autere (1888–1967)
Gunnar Berndtson (1854–1895)
Irina Bäcksbacka (1919–2002)
Bror Börjeson (1903–1999)
Jan van de Cappelle (1626–1679)
Birger Carlstedt (1907–1975)
Alwar Cawén (1886–1935)
Fanny Churberg (1845–1892)
Ina Colliander (1905–1985)
Marcus Collin (1882–1966)
Camille Corot (1796–1875)
Gustave Courbet (1819–1877)
Elin Danielson-Gambogi (1861–1919)
Gösta Diehl (1899–1964)
Albert Edelfelt (1854–1905)
Ragnar Ekelund (1892–1960)
Magnus Enckell (1870–1925)
Erik Enroth (1917–1975)
Giovanni Antonio Fasolo (1530–1572)
Alfred William Finch (1854–1930)
Gunnar Finne (1886–1952)
Peter Frie (* 1947)
Akseli Gallen–Kallela (1865–1931)
Noora Geagea (* 1981)
Pekka Halonen (1865–1933)
Sasha Huber (* 1975)
Heikki Häiväoja (* 1929)
Väinö Hämäläinen (1876–1940)
Eero Järnefelt (1863–1937)
Dzamil Kamanger (* 1948)
Väinö Kamppuri (1891–1972)
Harry Kivijärvi (1931–2010)
Nils Kreuger (1858–1930)
Antti Laitinen (* 1975)
Pieter Lastman (1583–1633)
Blas de Ledesma (n. 1546–1614)
Jani Leinonen (* 1978)
Bruno Liljefors (1860–1939)
Amélie Lundahl (1850–1914)
William Lönnberg (1887–1949)
Mauno Markkula (1905–1959)
Åke Mattas (1920–1962)
Claude Monet (1840–1926)
Hjalmar Munsterhjelm (1840–1905)
Eemu Myntti (1890–1943)
Jussi Mäntynen (1886–1978)
Eero Nelimarkka (1891–1977)
Elin Nordlund (1855–1932)
Yrjö Ollila (1887–1932)
Sami Parkkinen (* 1974)
Oscar Parviainen (1880–1938)
Tuulikki Pietilä (1917–2009)
Ben Renvall (1903–1979)
Essi Renvall (1911–1979)
Ilja Repin (1844–1930)
Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652)
Riku Riippa (* 1974)
Juho Rissanen (1873–1950)
Walter Runeberg (1838–1920)
Jalmari Ruokokoski (1886–1936)
Riiko Sakkinen (* 1976)
Martin Saks (1902–1962)
Tyko Sallinen (1879–1955)
Greta Schalin (1897–1993)
Sigrid Schauman (1877–1979)
Helene Schjerfbeck (1862–1946)
Lennart Segerstråle (1892–1975)
Ida Silfverberg (1834–1899)
Hugo Simberg (1873–1917)
Wilho Sjöström (1873–1944)
Frans Snyders (1579–1657)
Louis Sparre (1863–1964)
David Teniers, nuorempi (1610–1690)
Ellen Thesleff (1869–1954)
Verner Thomé (1878–1953)
Aimo Tukiainen (1917–1996)
Katja Tukiainen (* 1969)
Ragnar Ungern (1885–1955)
Aukusti Uotila (1858–1886)
Ville Vallgren (1855–1940)
Sam Vanni (1908–1992)
Anthonie van Verstralen (1593/94–1641)
Sebastian Vrancx (1573–1647)
Johanna Väisänen (* 1972)
Isak Wacklin (1720–1758)
Torsten Wasastjerna (1863–1924)
Maria Wiik (1853–1928)
Victor Westerholm (1860–1919)
Rogier van der Weyden, ateljee (1399/1400–1464)
Emil Wikström (1864–1942)
Ferdinand von Wright (1822–1906)
Magnus von Wright (1805–1868)
Anders Zorn (1860–1920)
Francisco de Zurbarán (1598–1664)
Juan de Zurbarán (1620–1649)