Serlachius museot

Feel free to
come farther

+358 (0)3 488 6800 | Gustaf, R. Erik. Serlachiuksen katu 2 | Gösta, Joenniementie 47 | Mänttä

Open summertime 1 June–31 August daily 10am–6pm.

Sulje

+358 (0)3 488 6800 | Gustaf, R. Erik. Serlachiuksen katu 2 | Gösta, Joenniementie 47 | Mänttä

Open
summertime 1 June–31 August daily 10am–6pm
wintertime 1 September–31 May Tue–Sun 11am–6pm
Closed 6 Dec, 24–25 Dec, 31 Dec, 25 Mar and 30 Apr

Feel free to
come farther

In Strindberg’s Rooms

The age-old camera obscura technique enables mapping out environments and mindscapes, tempting subliminal emotions into the light.

At Gösta 30 Sep 2017–21 Jan 2018

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In Strindberg’s Rooms

How do we see the world? Can something be born out of nothing? These questions are what the photo artist Marja Pirilä’s exhibition, which is an homage to the very old camera obscura technique, ponders on.

Marja Pirilä made her newest photographic series in the artist residence at Grez-sur-Loing in France. She made a camera obscura in the apartment that was at her disposal, by covering the windows with black plastic and letting the light seep in through small holes, in which she placed simple lenses. In this way, the view that opened onto the main street and the central plaza of the small village emerged in the rooms as upside down reflections.

In the same apartment, August Strindberg (1849–1912), one of Sweden’s most important and controversial writers, had stayed in the 1880ies. Strindberg was also a pioneer of early photography, whose unprejudiced photographic experiments and thoughts inspire Pirilä to try new ways.

The result is a series of views created by the camera obscura, where the exteriors and interiors float into each other and create dreamlike worlds. Shadows and lights now meet in Strindberg’s rooms. At the exhibition you can also acquaint yourself with a camera obscura made in an old cupboard, and see a phenomenon that is at the same time simple and magical. The curator of the exhibition is Laura Kuurne.


At Serlachius Museum Gösta 30 September 2017–21 January 2018